Chalonnais and Mercurey

The Southern Burgundy region of France is basically three districts; Beaujolais, Maconnais and Chalonnais.  I just discussed Beaujolais, and now I will give a brief chat about the Chalonnais.  This is probably the least known area of the whole Burgundy area, as it dwarfed by its neighbors to the north, and the ones in the south.  The area is referred to as the Chalonnais because of the city Chalon-sur-Saone.

 

The area is known for its red wines, using the Pinot Noir grape.  While making a very fine wine, the wine is lighter than the Burgundy wine districts, so they are in the shadow of their near relations.  The wines though are very attractive and not as dear as a Burgundy appellation, which makes them more affordable.

 

 

The two main villages of this area are Givry and Mercurey.  They are both under similar Appellation Controlee laws as the Burgundy region.  Givry produces small quantities of wine and is seldom seen here.  Whereas Mercurey produces almost as much wine as Gevrey-Chambertin or Pommard, so the wine is found sometimes on wine lists and better wine shops.  If you can find it, you will enjoy a most pleasant bottle of wine and your wallet will thank you.

About thewineraconteur

A non-technical wine writer, who enjoys the moment with the wine, as much as the wine. Twitter.com/WineRaconteur Instagram/thewineraconteur Facebook/ The Wine Raconteur
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2 Responses to Chalonnais and Mercurey

  1. Love me some Côte Chalonaise!

    • There is so much to taste and to try. Thankfully I saved the labels. Of course there are many that I cannot get to, as they are on the walls behind the racks. Keep enjoying what you are doing.
      – John

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